Agenda and Materials

This page is continually being updated with materials from the CI4MF 2024. Please check back for more slides and recordings, as they become available.

Day 1

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Time Title Speaker
7 a.m. Breakfast  
8 a.m.

Workshop Welcome

Slides

Video

Ewa Deelman, Director and Principal Investigator (PI) of CI Compass
8:15 a.m.

Keynote: Leveraging NSF's Cyberinfrastructure to Support Major Facilities Research

Slides

Video

Katie Antypas (NSF, OAC)
9 a.m.

Update on CI Compass Activities

FAIR Data Topical Working Group

Slides

CI Community Building: Surveys

Slides

CI Compass Fellowship Program

Slides

Cloud Topical Working Group: Cloud Report

Slides

Session Video (with timestamps)

Introduction: Ewa Deelman

FAIR Data TWG: Don Brower

CI Community Building: Kerk Kee

CICF Program: Angela Murillo

Cloud TWG: Bob Flynn, Internet2

10 a.m.

Coffee Break

 
10:30 a.m.

Panel: Major Facilities (MF) Approach to Open Science: FAIR Data, Persistent Identifiers, etc.

Large facilities deal with a large number of datasets, and complicated datasets. This data is useful to both scholarship as well as daily life. This raises questions of how to manage this data to enable its reuse by researchers and the public. Specifically, what kinds of systems have proved useful and not useful? Are there any small steps can we take to improve interoperability between facilities and scientists, and make good use of our cyberinfrastructure?

 

Session Video (with timestamps)

Moderator: Don Brower  - Slides

Panelists:

David Butcher (MagLab) - Slides

Jonah Kanner (LIGO) - Slides

Monica Youngman (NOAA/NCEI) - Slides

Amber Boehnlein (JLab) - Slides

Shawna Sadler (ORCID) - Slides

12 p.m. Lunch Break and Group Picture  
1:45 p.m.

Lightning Talks

Community Presenters

Benedikt Riedel (IceCube)
Slides

Tyson Swetnam (CyVerse)
Slides

Michael Zentner (SDSC/SGX3) 
Slides

 

3 p.m. Coffee Break  
3:30 p.m.

Breakout Session 1

Making MF Data More Accessible: Data Visualization and Analytics

The data generated, hosted, and used by NSF Major Facilities challenges the existing national cyberinfrastructure because of its size and complexity. The need to easily analyze, visualize, and share the data is key to making sure each facility fulfills its mission. Still, technological, infrastructure, and cultural challenges hinder this important part of the data lifecycle. In this breakout session, moderated by Dr. Valerio Pascucci and Dr. Dan Stanzione, we invite you to participate in a dialog about the specific needs and challenges that your community faces. Participating offers an excellent opportunity for the exchange of knowledge, establishing collaborations, and shaping the trajectory of cyberinfrastructure development in support of scientific discoveries. Please share your experiences, perspectives, and visions with the group to collectively shape the future of computational scientific research.

Speakers:

Dan Stanzione (TACC)

Valerio Pascucci, co-PI of CI Compass

3:30 p.m.

Breakout Session 2

Use of National CI for MFs and Their Users

Join us for this pivotal session focusing on the use of national advanced computing infrastructure by NSF Major Facilities. Moderated by seasoned experts in building cyberinfrastructure for sciences, Dr. Jarek Nabrzyski and Dr. Miron Livny, this session aims to engage the major facilities community in a vital dialogue. We invite contributions that discuss the challenges and aspirations regarding national cyberinfrastructure resources. Share your experiences, insights, and visions to collectively shape the future of computational support in scientific research. This session is an excellent opportunity for collaboration, learning, and influencing the trajectory of cyberinfrastructure development in support of groundbreaking scientific endeavors.

 Speakers:

Jarek Nabrzyski, co-PI of CI Compass, founding director of the Center for Research Computing at the University of Notre Dame

Miron Livny (OSG)

4:45 p.m.

Breakout Session Reports Back

 
5:05 p.m.

Reception

 
7 p.m.

Dinner (not provided, but groups encouraged)

 

Day 2

Thursday, January 18, 2024

7 a.m. Breakfast  
8 a.m. Day 2 Welcome Ewa Deelman
8:05 a.m.

Invited Talk: Enabling Open Science and Data Sharing: Trust, Provenance, and Data Integrity

Open Science is driven by knowledge discovery and innovation and fueled by the wide dissemination of scholarly publications and data. Information Assurance (inclusive of cybersecurity, data protections (including privacy), cyber risk management, and resilience) provides tools that support the practical implementation of FAIR principles. This talk explores how FAIR, Information Assurance, and Research Security are related and why each domain needs to better recognize their shared concerns.

Michael Corn, NSF/CORF

Slides

8:30 a.m.

Panel: Coordinating and Combining Data Processing, Movements, and Storage

Major facilities use a wide variety of approaches to acquire, process and store many types of data in support of their goals. A common thread however is the ever increasing speed at which these processes take place and wider and wider bandwidths and storage volumes required to support them. Simultaneously, advances in hardware and software allow for rethinking and repositioning of where some of the steps in these workflows take place. The general paradigm of acquire-transport-store-process gives way to more flexible pipelines where some of the intelligence and computation is migrating closer to the source of the data or into the network. This panel will discuss how different and diverse facilities deal with orchestrating the processes supporting their data acquisition and processing workflows and where they see future trends taking them.

Moderator: Ilya Baldin, senior personnel of CI Compass

Panelists:

Benedikt Riedel (IceCube)

Slides

Julio Ibarra (AmLight, RAPTOR, EnviStor)

Slides

Chris Romsos (RCRV/ARF)

Slides

Rob Casey (EarthScope)

Slides

 10 a.m.

Coffee Break 

 
 10:30 a.m.

Invited Talk: Designing Cyberinfrastructure for the Antarctic Research Vessel

The Antarctic Research Vessel (ARV) Project involves the design and eventual construction and delivery of a new icebreaking research vessel to replace the current vessel, Nathaniel B. Palmer. The project is just finishing the preliminary design phase and Cyberinfrastructure is a key component of the design focus. As a research vessel, the ARV is a floating laboratory and data gathering system operating in the harsh environments of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. Early planning is critical to ensure that data from all the installed instrumentation and that brought on board by embarked scientists is captured, distributed, analyzed and archived. In addition, modern day ships systems such as propulsion, navigation, communications and life support all rely on a robust cyberinfrastructure. This talk will give an overview of the process and extent of the Cyberinfrastructure design for ARV.

Speaker:

Mike Prince (NSF/GEO/OPP/AIL)

Slides

 10:50 a.m.

Lightning Talks: 2

Community Presenters 

 Speakers:

Shawna Sadler (ORCID)

Slides

Renaine Julian (FSU/NSF FAIR Facilities and Instruments)

Slides

Jim Basney (TrustedCI)

Slides

Jameson Rollins (LIGO)

Slides

Meredith Goins (World Data system)

Slides

 11:50 a.m. Lunch   
 1:15 p.m.

Panel: If I knew then what I know now, I would have never designed it this way: Approaches to CI conceptualization and design

The NSF Major Facilities (MFs) are major investments to advance research in several fields of science and engineering, providing state-of-the-art instruments, networks, observatories, accelerators, telescopes, research vessels, etc. to the scientific communities they serve. Cyberinfrastructure (CI) is a critical component of the MFs, which enables the transformation of raw data into more interoperable and integration-ready data products that can be visualized, disseminated, and transformed into insights and knowledge. Being very large investments, MFs go through several lifecycle stages. Significant effort goes into planning and designing the components of a MF, as they are constructed, eventually going through operations and periodic enhancements. These different points in an MF lifecycle have significant implications on how the CI supporting the MF is conceptualized, designed and evolved over time.

This session will discuss (a) what the important factors should be considered when designing the CI for a new MF, (b) how should the CI requirements from the scientific community be captured and integrated into the CI design, (c) what should be considered to offer flexibility in the design to accommodate future changes and technology evolutions, and (d) how should CI enhancements be designed once MFs go into operations and how MF CI should be evolving during operations. We will hear from panelists - representatives from MFs who have experienced different lifecycle stages - about lessons learnt and best practices in CI conceptualization and design and pitfalls that should be avoided in the future.

 

Moderators:

Anirban Mandal and Rob Casey

Slides

Panelists:

Rob Casey (SAGE/GAGE)

Slides

Frank Wuerthwein (LHC)

Slides

Dan Stanzione (TACC)

Slides

Sabine Botha (CXFEL)

Slides

 2:30 p.m.

Tabletop Discussions

What are the challenges you are facing in your work?
Are there some topical working groups you would like to see CI Compass form?
What topics would you like to see discussed at RIW 2024 and future community meetings?
Is there anything else you would like to share with us? 

 Speaker: Ewa Deelman (CI Compass/USC)

2:55 p.m.

Workshop Closing Remarks

Speaker: Ewa Deelman (CI Compass/USC)

3 p.m.

Social Coffee Hour